Take Action

You’ve done your research, worked to expand your network, and strategized about how best to market yourself. Now it is time to take the next step to actualize your career goals. There are a variety of ways to make that next step, from on-campus recruiting and internships to international placements. Explore the different paths to attaining your ideal job.

Employment Overview

Once you have completed all of your research, and you have begun to build or expand your network, you need to do an overview of the current job market and the type of career you seek. This will allow you to recalibrate any of your assumptions, or adjust your skill set to address the most recent sector or industry trends.

TIP:

  • Industries and companies sometimes undergo change in a short amount of time, in response to systemic trends or global events. Do not assume that a particular sector or industry that was thriving a few years ago is currently enjoying that same rate of growth or level of financial health.

TOOLS:

  • There are online resources that can help provide forecasting and search guides for various types of jobs. Rotman Management Career Guides offer a great overview of various types of jobs and industries.

LINKS:


Online Job Postings

There are many different online job posting platforms now available, and it is important to understand the search functionality and job parameters unique to each. Invest some time to learn how each of these sites categorizes and lays out their job listings.

Rotman Commerce Job Posting Board: Search for and apply to full-time, part-time, internship, summer and volunteer opportunities. Each year thousands of employers post exclusive jobs for Commerce Students. We recommend you visit the Rotman Business Information Centre – Careers  to research company information before applying.

Using keyword or company name searches, review job postings on sites like Indeed.ca or LinkedIn. Refer to postings for the same role at multiple companies to determine common requirements, and survey the market. Copy and paste job postings into a Word document and save, so you can use them later for keywords

TIP:

Students are encouraged to review job postings on the Career Learning Network – CLN. Each year over 10,000 jobs are posted to the University community.

TOOLS:

Below are a sample of many links to popular online job platforms:

General Job Posting Sites

  • Canadajobs.com: Canada’s source for job search “how-to” articles and tips.
  • Indeed: Search for Jobs in Canada
  • CareerBuilder: Search for jobs in Canada and around the world.
  • Eluta.ca: Search for new jobs in Canada.
  • Government of Canada Job Bank: Search for jobs by province.
  • Job Search Canada: Search for careers by field or degree with Canada’s National Career Education and Planning tool.
  • Job Postings Magazine: Student jobs, entry level jobs, internships across Canada.
  • Neuvoo: Job postings across Canada, with over 40,000 postings in Ontario alone.
  • Ontario WorkInfoNET: See links to work- and career-related websites in Ontario. There are also WorkInfoNets for each province and territory across Canada.
  • Resume Target: includes a job board that allows you to set up daily job alerts and compiles a list of suitable job postings from major and niche job boards across North America.
  • Working.com: Search for jobs across Canada, get career advice, and read about current labour market trends.
  • Workopolis.com: Lists a variety of job opportunities.
  • Wowjobs: Search more than 100,000 jobs from thousands of job boards, classifieds and company sites in Canada.

Targeted Job Search Sites

Jobs in Hospitality or Tourism

Jobs in Media

Green Jobs

Working Abroad


On-Campus Recruiting (OCR)

On-Campus Recruiting is a recruiting method used mostly by large, global employers seeking to hire students into new graduate positions starting in Spring. Positions are open to undergraduate students entering their final year of study. Employers consist mainly of companies across the financial services, consulting, consumer packaged goods, technology, and healthcare sectors.

OCR is a highly competitive process spanning beyond Rotman Commerce to all undergraduate and many other graduate programs across the GTA, Ontario, Canada and abroad with employers seeking to hire the top talent of the graduating class. Factors such as undergraduate GPA, relevant work experience and fit are all important factors for interview selection. Interviews require significant preparation including company research, networking with alumni, and detailed technical/case and behavioural preparation.

To highlight the competitiveness, note that under 10% of the graduating class will secure employment via the OCR recruiting cycle, leaving the remaining 90% to pursue a self-directed job search, much like working professional students already rely on.

Preparation for OCR begins with researching target industries, companies and roles, participating in club or case competitions, preparing extensively for technical interviews, refining your pitch and networking with alumni and company representatives. The Fall OCR cycle itself consists of company presentations open only to graduating students, job posting applications, and (possibly) interviews.

TIPS:

  • As an undergraduate student, you need to be prepared to alter your schedule to suit the employer and their recruiting campaign. This means planning to reschedule personal and extra-curricular activities to accommodate a possible busy interview recruitment season.
  • Students are encourage to visit the Rotman Commerce Portal for updates on OCR dates, events and information sessions.

LINKS:

  • Log on to the Rotman Commerce Portal > Career Centre > Resources for useful resources related to On-Campus Recruitment.

Internships and Experiential Learning

Internships are a great way to learn a work culture, test drive your skills, and network within an industry. By exploring these experiential learning opportunities, you can increase your understanding of a business and further network with key players.

TIP:

  • Consider that an internship can function as a sort of extended job interview. Look for tasks or assignments where you can maximize your exposure to the work and spend face time with professionals.

TOOLS:

  • Explore various internship opportunities starting with the links included below.

LINKS:

  • Log on to the Rotman Commerce Portal > Career Centre > Resources for more resources on internships and experiential learning.

Professional Experience Year (PEY)

The Professional Experience Year (PEY) Internship Program at the University of Toronto provides undergraduate students with a 12-16 month paid internship where they can apply their academic knowledge in a project-based professional environment as part of ongoing career development.

PEY is open to Rotman Commerce students in years 2 or 3 who seek to combine their business education in accounting, finance, management and marketing to the business community. Past students have completed internships roles as business analysts, marketing interns and in supply chain services.

TIPS:

  • Many employers find this type of internships to be extremely valuable in determining hirability.

Through the PEY program, employers are able to:

  • Access qualified students that meet academic requirements of Rotman’s leading undergraduate business program
  • Evaluate a student’s potential as a future employee while they complete short term projects
  • Mentor energetic and enthusiastic students as they share new ideas and a fresh perspective in the workplace

TOOLS:

LINKS:


Working Abroad

Working in other countries allows you to broaden your horizons. Consider the different options that may open up if you explore working internationally. Whether it is a temporary working holiday placement, or a full-time assignment, gaining experience abroad can help to refine your interests and allow you to discover new or previously hidden values.

TIPS:

  • This type of placement can greatly enhance your resume for employers that do business internationally.
  • Ensure that your assignment aligns with, or compliments, your existing skill set in order to maximize that experience for future potential employment.

TOOLS:

  • Many organizations specialize in connecting job seekers with international placements (see links below). Choose the type of placement that fits best with your study or existing travel plans.

LINKS:


Offers

Once you have had a successful interview, the final step is understanding an employment offer. It is important to have done your research thoroughly before this stage, so that you understand what level of salary, benefits, and other perks are common for this type of career.

Often the turnaround on this stage is very short, so you need to respond confidently and quickly to any offer you receive. Your potential employer will not revoke an offer if you inquire, in a professional manner, if the salary and other components are negotiable.

Components of an Offer

  1. Salary: the base compensation of the position.
  2. Bonus Structure: any additional compensation linked to performance or KPIs.
  3. Benefits: health, vision, dental, counselling, additional HR support, etc.
  4. Additional Perks: vacation entitlement, profit sharing, stock options, working from home, flexible/personal time, tuition, fitness membership, corporate discounts.

TIPS:

  • Understand the pay scale for the type of position. Naturally, asking for a markedly larger salary than the range offered can cause a loss of the employment offer. Conversely, asking for compensation below the offered range can denote a lack of experience, confidence, or capability.
  • The most important ingredient for negotiating is attitude. Plan with a positive attitude and the desire for a win/win outcome.
  • Negotiate from a reasonable position with rationale for the alternatives you propose.
  • Link all negotiable items to the job itself.
  • If there are several points to negotiate, set them all out at one time.
  • You may want other items besides base salary e.g. vacation, signing bonus, accelerated time to promotion, etc.
  • Negotiate job content, including responsibilities, authority, interactions, and staff support at the time of the offer.
  • When negotiating salary, know what the going rate is for comparable positions in similar size companies in the industry and location.
  • Avoid discussing perks until major issues (salary, bonuses, etc.) have been agreed upon. Mentioning them earlier can put issues on the table that can be negotiated away.
  • Never make an impromptu decision during a negotiation. You must decide the limits of your flexibility before you begin negotiation.

TOOLS:

  • Use the links below to better understand the types of offer and compensation packages for your desired career, and calibrate your negotiations accordingly.

LINKS: